Hurricane Florence Is Dumping a Huge Amount of Rain on the Carolinas

Jacob Harrelson and his wife Beth Harrelson install protective plywood on a local business in anticipation of Hurricane Florence in Wilmington N.C. on Wednesday

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The NHC warned hurricane Florence will cause "catastrophic" flooding as the Carolinas are hit with 40 inches of rainfall. Tropical Force winds of 58 to 73 miles per hour are expected in the area. And that's just the prelude to untold days of misery. "This will cause extremely risky flooding".

"Catastrophic effects will be felt outside the center of the storm due to storm surge as high as 9 to 13 feet".

Duke Energy, the nation's No. 2 power company, said Florence could knock out electricity to three-quarters of its 4 million customers in the Carolinas, and outages could last for weeks. "Tens of thousands of structures are expected to be flooded, and many more by rising rivers and creeks".

"We have two boats and all our worldly possessions", said Susan Patchkofsky, who refused her family's pleas to evacuate and stayed at Emerald Isle with her husband.

"And when the tide comes back up around noon, we will be inundated with additional storm surge", she said.

Florence is expected to arrive in southeast North Carolina on Friday morning before drifting south into SC.

More than one million people had been ordered to evacuate the coasts of North and SC and Virginia and thousands moved to emergency shelters, officials said.

Hurricane-force winds extended 80 miles (130 kilometres) from its centre, and tropical-storm-force winds reached out to 195 miles (315 kilometres).

"It's cumulative damage", Myers said. "Then, a long time later, they started to report really large numbers, like 3000". "So will the power lines, as the trees fall down".

The Charleston area will see winds near tropical storm strength of 40 miles per hour and somewhere between 3 to 6 inches of rain. As the storm moves inland, Georgia, Virginia and Maryland will also be in peril.

"This large-scale feature is expected to keep the hurricane moving northwestward today, followed by a turn toward the west at a much slower speed on Friday as the ridge to the north of Florence weakens due to a weak shortwave trough dropping slowly southward from the Ohio Valley". Officials said at least 150 people were "awaiting rescue" early Friday morning as the risky. Those numbers will only rise as the slow-moving storm hovers over the region through at least Saturday (Sept. 15), according to the National Hurricane Center (NHC).

"You put your life at risk by staying", Cooper said.

He Tweeted: "We are getting nailed by #hurricane force winds and blinding rain at Wrightsville Beach". According to Fire Chief Glen Rogers, there are in fact only 12 people left on the beach to sit out the storm.

"Even the rescuers can not stay there", he said.

In Wilmington, North Carolina, a steady rain began to fall as gusts of winds intensified, causing trees to sway and stoplights to flicker.

With winds picking up along the coastline earlier Thursday, federal and state officials had issued final appeals to residents to get out of the path of the "once in a lifetime" weather system.

ISS astronauts have the best view of Earth available with a giant orbiting space station packed with cameras and portals to look out of. "You may need to move up to the second story, or to your attic, but WE ARE COMING TO GET YOU".

"Florence is still a unsafe storm", said Rebecca Fuller, a meteorologist with Radiant Solutions in Gaithersburg, Maryland. Tropical Storm Isaac is forecast to approach the Lesser Antilles Islands on Thursday. Hurricane Helene is veering toward Europe.

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