Perseids 2018: Where and how to watch the dazzling meteor shower

Perseid meteor shower 2018

GETTY PERSEID METEOR SHOWER The dazzling display can be seen mid-August

The Perseids appear to emanate from between the constellations Perseus and Cassiopeia, but to catch them there's really no need to worry about which direction you're looking.

With the moon just a thin crescent in the sky around the time of this year's peak - and setting early in the evening - the sky will be left even darker, making the meteors that much easier to spot.

"You should be able to see some meteors from July 17 to August 24, with the rates increasing during the weeks before August 12 and decreasing after the 13th", NASA said in a skywatching video.

Even if you aren't an avid astronomer, you'll still have a great view.

The peak nights for this year's shower will be from August 11 to 12 and August 12 to 13, with more than 100 meteors visible per hour, according to Gary Boyle, an Ottawa-based astronomer.

During the Perseid meteor shower, spectators will see about 60 to 70 meteors per hour.

The annual show is the result of Earth's proximity to the "gritty" debris of Comet 109P/Swift-Tuttle, Boyle said in a release.

As meteors enter the earth's atmosphere they leave streaks of light in the sky, which some people call shooting stars.

There will also be a partial solar eclipse on August 11. You may have a slightly better chance if you face northeast.

Muscat: The Sultanate is now witnessing the Perseids, which are the most famous meteor showers. He added that it takes at least 30 minutes for human eyes to adjust, so be patient and that you can expect to be outdoors for a few hours. Some more good news - with the New Moon coming on August 11, the light pollution will be low. And if you're intrepid enough to travel to a dark sky park, here are some of the absolute best in the United States.

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