NYC reins in Uber with cap on ride-hail vehicles

New York City caps Uber and Lyft vehicles — a first-in-the-nation move

Cars in Manhattan including a yellow taxi make their way around a ride-hailing vehicle picking up passengers

New York City moved Wednesday to regulate the explosive growth of Uber and other app-based ride services with a temporary cap on new licenses for ride-hailing services.

Backers of the proposals say both the traditional yellow cab industry and drivers for app-based services are suffering as Uber cars flood the city's streets.

At the end of July, we learned that the New York City Council was looking into capping the number of ride-sharing vehicles in the city while it tried to figure out related issues like congestion. A surge in ridership has coincided with increased resident frustration with the local subway system.

"We hope this is the start of a more fair industry not only here in New York City, but all over the world", the labor group's founder, Jim Conigliaro Jr., said in a statement.

Mayor Bill de Blasio, who has championed. The unchecked growth of app-based for-hire vehicle companies has demanded action - and now we have it.

Uber and Lyft users might have to wait a bit longer for a ride when the cap is put in effect - or they could just walk to the curb and lift up an arm, like we all used to.

The New York City Council voted Wednesday to freeze new vehicle licenses for one year while the city studies ways of reducing traffic congestion, among other steps.

The New York Taxi Workers Alliance, an 18,000-member union representing the city's taxi drivers, hailed the council's vote as a victory. The study recommended a $17.22 hourly minimum wage after expenses, arguing the measure would cover the costs of owning and driving a auto in the city and allow for paid time off. City officials would set the wage.

But Councilwoman Laurie Cumbo, a Democrat, said Uber will still be available despite the moratorium on new cars.

There's also an eclipsing number of ride-hailing vehicles on the road compared to taxis: About 80,000 drivers in the city are affiliated with four ridehailing companies - Juno, Lyft, Uber and Via - according to a recent report from The New School's Center for New York City Affairs.

"These sweeping cuts to transportation will bring New Yorkers back to an era of struggling to get a ride, particularly for communities of color and in the outer boroughs", Joseph Okpaku, Lyft's vice president of public policy said.

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