Britain’s May wins parliament vote after bowing to Brexit pressure

Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May leaves the BBC after appearing on the Andrew Marr Show in central London

Parliament vote to reveal extent of anger over May's Brexit plan

Greening claimed there are three Brexit options: the prime minister's final Brexit deal, staying in the European Union, and leaving the European Union with "no deal".

"I'm sure Theresa May does not want to split the Conservative Party and therefore she will find that the inevitable outcome of the parliamentary arithmetic is that she will need to change it (the Brexit policy) to keep the party united", Rees-Mogg said.

Theresa May's long-running battle with her divided Conservative Party took a potentially more unsafe turn, as one of her former ministers began assembling lawmakers to vote against her Brexit plans.

The prime minister has issued a stark warning to MPs that failure to back her plan for Brexit would risk the United Kingdom not leaving the European Union at all.

Justine Greening has become the highest profile Conservative MP to undermine Theresa May's Brexit plan publicly.

"I can not find someone who supported leave within the Conservative MPs (Members of Parliament) who is happy with the (Chequers) proposal if you talk to them in private", Peter Bone, a Conservative lawmaker and Brexit campaigner, told Sky News.

"We're back to what civil servants wanted a year ago, the advice they were giving then, of something like the EEA (European Economic Area membership) plus something like the customs union".

Remain-supporting Conservatives were angry at the speed with which she caved into ERG pressure and could stage their own rebellion on Tuesday on a Trade Bill. "[Brexit] grasps the opportunities of an independent trade policy, freeing us to forge new trade deals with allies across the world - including America, where President Trump has made it clear he wants a trade deal and is now confident we will be able to do it", she wrote.

Meanwhile Johnson's first intervention since he quit was low-key, an article in the Telegraph urging the country to "believe in ourselves, to believe in the British people and what they can do, and in our democracy". I think it was a genuine clever attempt at a compromise that could work.

A former U.K. Cabinet minister from the ruling Conservative Party on Monday called for a new Brexit referendum, an idea long assailed by the prime minister.

"I'm sure Theresa May does not want to split the Conservative Party and therefore she will find that the inevitable outcome of the parliamentary arithmetic is that she will need to change it (the Brexit policy) to keep the party united", Rees-Mogg said.

Following the publication of the PM's Chequers plan in a white paper, it had been thought Tory Remainers would withdraw their amendments and offer their support to the government's proposals.

The Customs Bill amendment was tabled by Brexiteer Tories and the government announced earlier that it would back it.

Asked about the chances of success for Mrs May's strategy, Mr Clark told Today: "This is a White Paper that is now the basis of our negotiation".

A YouGov poll of 1,732 voters for The Times found that 39% felt the Chequers deal did not respect the result of the referendum, and 42% felt the deal would not be good for Britain, compared to 13% who thought it would.

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