Plasma waves turned into sound by researchers — Sounds of Saturn

Sulaiman et al found a powerful interaction of plasma waves moving from Saturn to its rings and Enceladus. Image credit NASA  JPL-Caltech

Sulaiman et al found a powerful interaction of plasma waves moving from Saturn to its rings and Enceladus. Image credit NASA JPL-Caltech

It is the first detection of its kind and shows how plasma waves travel on magnetic field lines between Saturn and Enceladus.

The interaction between Enceladus and Saturn differs markedly from the relationship that Earth shares with its moon, with one of Saturn's rings created from a geyser found on Enceladus, showing that ours is a much more mundane relationship.

Researchers studying the Cassini data converted the recordings of plasma waves into an audio file that humans can hear in a process similar to the way radios translate electromagnetic waves into music that can be heard, reports NASA.

Previously HB reported that an global group of researchers discovered complex organic molecules in the ocean on Saturn's moon Enceladus. At the end of the day, Cassini recognized electromagnetic waves in the sound recurrence extend - and on the ground, we can open up and play those signs through a speaker. Our own Moon does not collaborate similarly with Earth.

Enceladus is immersed in Saturn's magnetic field and is geologically active, emitting plumes of water vapor that become ionized and fill the environment around Saturn.

The whooshing sound heard in the clip is 16 minutes of plasma exchange between Saturn and Enceladus compressed into 29 seconds of audio.

According to Ali Sulaiman, a planetary scientist associated with the research: "Enceladus is this little generator going around Saturn, and we know it is a continuous source of energy".

The "circuitry" between the planet and its moon is the subject of two recent papers in the journal Geophysical Research Letters.

NASA said the plasma waves were detected on September 2, 2017, about two weeks before Cassini ended its mission with a bang by deliberately crashing into Saturn. Comparable associations happen amongst Saturn and its rings, as they are additionally extremely powerful. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of Caltech in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington. The RPWS instrument was built by the University of Iowa, working with team members from the US and several European countries.

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