Incredible video shows 4-mile iceberg breaking in Greenland

"The better we understand what is happening, the more precisely we can predict and plan for climate change", explains an employee at NY University, Denise Holland.

In April this year, New York University received a $2.1 million, five-year grant from the National Science Foundation to better understand Antarctic glaciers and the forces behind sea-level rise.

Researchers also managed to capture on camera a video that shows the noticeable violence and speed of the ice breaking event that is now ongoing.

Also, these effects include a side effect that only supports the continuous melting of more glaciers, the warming water effect that generates more and more icebergs that eventually melt away in the ocean, making sea levels rise nonstop. This attracted a lot of attention to an extraordinary event, because such data was compared to the distance from the bottom to the middle of Manhattan in NY.

In 2017, scientists estimated that a collapse of the entire West Antarctic Ice Sheet, which is two-and-a-half miles thick and about as large as Texas, would raise global sea levels by 10 feet-inundating coastal cities around the world.

The research team is now studying the forces behind sea-level rise-a development that has concerned scientists in recent decades because it points to the possibility of global disruptions due to climate change-under a grant from the National Science Foundation.

"Global sea-level rise is both undeniable and consequential", said research team leader David Holland. But while there are abundant satellite observations of Antarctica's ice sheets, it's extremely challenging to gather data from the surface of the remote continent, Holland said. It may also offer a chance to study iceberg calving. New video could help make more accurate predictions about calving events. It's a tabular iceberg, long and flat; in the video, you can also see tall, thin pinnacle icebergs crack off and flip over.

"The range of these different iceberg formation styles helps us build better computer models for simulating and modeling iceberg calving".

The breaking off took place over the course of 30 minutes and began the night of June 22; the video has condensed the time of the incident to about 90 seconds.

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