Trump tariffs could sink Canada's auto industry

Trump: Trudeau criticism will cost Canada `a lot of money┬┤

Peter Navarro sorry for saying there's a 'special place in hell' for Trudeau

United States President Donald Trump's trade adviser Peter Navarro has apologized for saying there was a "special place in hell" for Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

"My job was to send a signal of strength", he said at a Wall Street Journal CFO Network conference in Washington on Tuesday.

"There's a special place in hell for any foreign leader that engages in bad-faith diplomacy with President Donald J. Trump and then tries to stab him in the back on the way out the door", he said.

A number of other Trump officials and the president himself also lashed out at the Canadian prime minister following the Gang of Seven summit in Canada last weekend. Trudeau's closing news conference at the Group of Seven leaders' summit in Quebec this weekend sparked a flurry of reactions from the Trump administration after the prime minister said the US decision to impose tariffs on Canadian steel and aluminum on national security grounds was "insulting".

Freeland said Tuesday that Trudeau had raised the auto issue in his bilateral meeting with Trump on Friday at the G7 summit.

From a big-picture perspective, there are concerns about how the rest of the world sees the United States globally, he added.

"From day one, we have said that we expected moments of drama and that we would keep calm and carry on throughout this drama", she said.

However, the office of the U.S. Trade Representative has said the United States ran an $8.4 billion trade surplus with Canada in 2017.

Navarro took the attack a step further on Sunday. "He learned", Mr Trump said, wagging his finger. And I say, push him around? "Other than he had a news conference that he had because he assumed I was in an airplane and I wasn't watching", Trump said.

Trudeau said the Liberal government looks forward to the details of the agreement that emerged from Monday's historic meeting between Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

"I think the first-hand interaction is likely to be a stronger factor than anything the president says", he said. "But you know, Trump threatened tariffs on steel and aluminum, and everybody said, 'Oh, well, you know he's not going to hit Canada, we're not a security threat.' And lo and behold, look what happened". "(Trudeau) learned. You can't do that. There was no immediate response to the apology from Trudeau.

His earlier comments had followed Trump's own sharp words for Trudeau, whom the president called "dishonest and weak" and accused of making "false statements".

One particular source of his ire recently has been Canada's supply management system, which levels tariffs of up to 300 per cent on imported dairy products.

A recent report by the Peterson Institute for International Economics found that blanket 25-per-cent tariffs on automobile imports to the US, including auto parts, would reduce production by 1.5 per cent and could cause job losses of 195,000 in the USA over the first three years, and would affect $200 billion in US imports.

"From the beginning we have said that our approach would be to hope for the best, to work for the best possible outcome but always be prepared for the worst, to have a Plan B, C, D, E and F - and maybe to the end of the alphabet".

Latest News