The lesson of today's government climbdown: we're likely heading for soft Brexit

Former PM says May could be ousted if EU vote goes against government

MPs will debate House of Lords amendments to the EU Bill head of a vote on Wednesday

"The Brexit secretary has set out three tests that any new amendment has to meet - not undermining the negotiations, not changing the constitutional role of parliament and government in negotiating global treaties, and respecting the referendum result". The results could also deliver a further blow to Prime Minister Theresa May's authority, which was severely damaged when she.

A Downing Street source said: "We will get a good Brexit deal that works for everybody in the UK".

On the return of the EU Withdrawal Bill for consideration by MPs on Tuesday, the government won all the day's votes as it overturned a series of House of Lords amendments to the key Brexit legislation.

But she faces a gruelling bout of "parliamentary ping-pong" with the Lords, as the Bill bounces back and forth between the two Houses over the coming weeks.

Protesters outside the UK Parliament in central London.

His resignation didn't prompt an immediate response from the government, but at the eleventh hour, ministers evidently feared a Commons defeat.

British Prime Minister Theresa May is urging feuding Conservative lawmakers to unite and prevent the government from being defeated in key votes on its main Brexit bill.

"It's not practical, it's not desirable and it's not appropriate", Davis said.

Mr Grieve withdrew his own amendment, which would have given MPs powers to dictate what the Government should do if no acceptable agreement is reached by February 2019.

The pro-EU faction got a boost when junior justice minister Phillip Lee resigned Tuesday, saying he could no longer support the government's "irresponsible" plans for Brexit. But there is going to be no binary choice of the deal on the table or no deal, with Parliament bypassed.

The change reduces the likelihood that Britain could leave the European Union without a deal if it does not like the divorce terms.

The concession on a meaningful vote came after intensive horse-trading on the floor of the House of Commons, with chief whip Julian Smith shuttling between Tory backbenchers during debate on Lords amendments to the EU Withdrawal Bill.

They've been battling against Brexit on a number of fronts, including trying to ensure that Scotland doesn't lose powers back to Westminster when they come back from Brussels.

The issue seen as most likely to provoke a rebellion was that of giving MPs a "meaningful vote" on the final Brexit deal.

The amendment in question hinges on whether lawmakers will get a "meaningful" vote on Britain's membership of the European Union. It also attacked the unelected nature of the House of Lords (which traditionally scrutinizes laws passed to it by the elected lower chamber), linking it to a perceived attempt to frustrate the Brexit process.

Latest News