NCAA Rule Change Will Prohibit Schools from Blocking Student-Athlete Transfers

Former Alabama offensive lineman Brandon Kennedy works through drills during Alabama football practice Monday Nov. 28 2016 at the Hank Crisp Indoor Facility in Tuscaloosa Ala

NCAA announces change to transfer policy, schools will no longer have ability to block transfers

"Redshirt football student-athletes are more likely to remain engaged with the team, and starters will be less likely to feel pressure to play through injuries", James said. "Coaches will appreciate the additional flexibility and ability to give younger players an opportunity to participate in limited competition".

This is an interesting, and I think mostly good, change.

In a news release posted Wednesday afternoon, the NCAA confirmed a slate of hugely significant rules changes to how players transfers and the highly debated "redshirt rule" that would allow players an easier path to maintaining an extra season of eligibility.

"This creates a safe place for student-athletes to have a conversation with their coaches and makes the whole process more transparent", Nicholas Clark said.

To address one specific concern, the Council specified that midyear enrollees can not use the exception to play a bowl game before their first academic term. Instead, the NCAA is creating a database in which schools must input a transfer candidate's information within two business days of that player filing their transfer paperwork.

Previously a player would lose his redshirt status after taking the field for a single play. The rule will put an end to a debatable practice wherein a DI coach would prevent an athlete wishing to transfer from contacting specific schools (usually rival schools).

The NCAA also took a step forward regarding player rights in the highly controversial transfer system by deciding to eliminate the permission-to-contact process, starting in October. Instead of a student-athlete asking for permission to transfer from his or her school, the student-athlete will now simply inform the school of his or her decision to transfer. The proposal was initially tabled in April over concerns about timing, the number of games and potential application to other sports, according to a release by the NCAA. Previously, college coaches were able to block the transferring athlete from certain schools, and the athlete was required to obtain permission for schools to contact him.

The NCAA said legislation that governs when a Power Five school can reduce or cancel financial aid for an athlete may be looked at next week.

That's one way the model could work, but there is no limitation, meaning that a player could be used in game one, then game eight, and then the Big Ten title game, and then the College Football Playoff and still count the year as a redshirt.

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