Ivanka Trump accused of tweeting 'fake' Chinese proverb

Ivanka Trump tweets 'Chinese' proverb, confusing China

Provenance of Ivanka's 'proverb' baffles Chinese internet users

Taking to the social media platform ahead of the historic summit between her father, US President Donald Trump, and rogue North Korean leader Kim Jong-un this week, Ms Trump tweeted: "Those who say it can not be done, should not interrupt those doing it", attributing the meaningful words to a Chinese proverb.

Asian Twitter couldn't resist having a little fun after reading an Ivanka Trump tweet that she described as a "Chinese Proverb". By 1962, it had been put behind the words "Confucius say" by another periodical.

It may have originated in 1903 in "The Public" - a Chicago-based magazine - and evolved over the years, according to a 2015 article by Quote Investigator.

Ivanka Trump has suffered another embarrassing mishap on Twitter after sharing an apparently fake "Chinese proverb".

Larry Herzberg, a professor of Chinese at Calvin College in MI, said Ivanka's tweet was "yet one more example of Americans ascribing a quote to the Chinese, often to Confucius, when they don't really know the origin of the saying".

Her tweet came on the eve of the day when her father, Donald Trump, met the North Korean leader at Capella Hotel in Singapore's Sentosa Island to hold talks, in a bid to resolve the decades-long nuclear stand-off between the two countries. Actually, the saying has been occasionally ascribed to the famous Irish playwright George Bernard Shaw, though there's no evidence of him ever having used it. Sina, owner of the Weibo social network, posted on its news feed, AFP reported.

"[My editor] really can't think of what exactly this proverb is".

On popular social media sites like Weibo, tens of thousands of people discussed genuine Chinese sayings that might convey something similar to Trump's post.

But her mysterious proverb was panned on Weibo.

"She saw it in a fortune cookie at Panda Express", one user wrote.

Bill Kristol, editor of United States political magazine The Weekly Standard, tweeted that the phrase "seems in fact to be American from the turn of the 20th century".

'But why are Trump WH (White House) aides giving our proverbs to China, increasing our proverb deficit?' he quipped.

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