Ex-Head Of Cambridge Analytica To Appear Before UK Committee

Cambridge Analytica boss Alexander Nix to appear before MPs on 6 June

The Latest: Zuckerberg to heading to EU next Tuesday

The EU and British parliaments have been calling for Zuckerberg to appear before them for weeks ever since it emerged that a company, political consultants Cambridge Analytica, had been allowed to misuse the data of millions of Facebook users.

Věra Jourová, the European Commissioner for Justice, Consumers and Gender Equality, said on her Twitter profile that she is glad to see Mark Zuckerberg accept this invitation but that it is pity it will not be a public hearing since many Europeans deserve to know exactly how their data is being handled.

Mark Zuckerberg will appear before the European Parliament to discuss Facebook's use of personal data, weeks after declining to give evidence to UK Parliament.

The committee tweeted that it remained open to Zuckerberg giving evidence via video link, or in person, adding: "Him not appearing before us is not just a snub to the DCMS committee, but more importantly a snub to the United Kingdom and the millions of Facebook users in the United Kingdom who deserve answers".

However, there are some Parliamentary members who are unhappy that the meeting will be behind closed doors.

Mr Tajani had invited Mr Zuckerberg, saying that the 2.7 million European Union citizens affected by the data sharing scandal deserved a full explanation.

The data which got exposed was highly sensitive and revealed the personal details of Facebook users like their results of psychological tests. "It's a step in the right direction towards restoring confidence".

On Monday, Zuckerberg will also attend a meeting organized by French President Emmanuel Macron aimed at pressuring tech giants to use their global influence for public good. "It must be a public hearing - why not a Facebook Live?" tweeted Guy Verhofstadt, a Belgian politician who is also a Brexit negotiator on behalf of the European Parliament. Although the data firm was working on behalf of President Donald Trump's 2016 campaign, it was able to sweep up information on about 2.7 million European residents too, according to statements from the European Commission.

Zuckerberg did agree to public sessions with United States lawmakers last month, following a major global privacy scandal related to user data and political ad targeting.

In a statement, Facebook said that it welcomed the chance to meet MEPs and "appreciate the opportunity for dialogue, to listen to their views and show the steps we are taking to better protect people's privacy".

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