Zuckerberg to meet European Union officials _ dodging public grilling

Cambridge Analytica announced on May 2 it will begin bankruptcy proceedings after losing clients and facing mounting legal fees

Cambridge Analytica announced on May 2 it will begin bankruptcy proceedings after losing clients and facing mounting legal fees

"Our citizens deserve a full and detailed explanation".

The news that none of these discussions will be held in public has angered some onlookers, with Brexit coordinator Guy Verhofstadt saying: "I will not attend the meeting with Mr Zuckerberg if it's held behind closed doors".

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has agreed to meet European Union parliamentarians in Brussels to give evidence about the company's use of personal data.

Mr Zuckerberg will be questioned by the chair of the European Parliament's justice and home affairs committee, Labour MEP Claude Moraes, and other MEPs in a session which will not be televised.

"There should be no double standards for the U.S. Congress and the European Parliament", - stated the co-Chairman of the faction "Greens - Free Alliance of Europe", Philippe Lamberts.

However, there are some Parliamentary members who are unhappy that the meeting will be behind closed doors. "It must be a public hearing - why not a Facebook Live?"

Zuckerberg's trip across the pond to visit Europe comes ahead of the implementation of the EU's data protection regulation.

He said the appearance could be as early as next week, and would be "a step in the right direction to restore trust".

This meeting, according to the European parliament president, Antonio Tajani, could happen as soon as next week.

Zuckerberg has so far declined to appear, to the British lawmakers' annoyance.

The world's largest social network has come under scrutiny over the way it handles personal data after revelations that British consultancy Cambridge Analytica, which worked on Donald Trump's 2016 presidential election campaign, improperly accessed the Facebook data of 87 million users.

There seems to be no end to the Cambridge Analytica controversy for Facebook.

The 40-page letter, in response to the committee's formal request for Facebook to respond to 39 points it felt Facebook CTO Mike Schroepfer answer answered unsatisfactorily last month when he appeared before MPs, arrived three days after an initial 11 May deadline - with Facebook requesting, and being granted, an extension.

"We are glad that Alexander Nix has accepted our summons".

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