Windrush: 63 people could have been wrongfully deported

Mr Bryan and his wife Janet McKay-Williams who worked tirelessly to secure his release from detention and the threat of deportation

Mr Bryan and his wife Janet McKay-Williams who worked tirelessly to secure his release from detention and the threat of deportation

At least 63 members of the Windrush generation could have been wrongfully removed or deported from the United Kingdom since 2002, the home secretary revealed yesterday.

It was the first time specific numbers have been outlined since the scandal involving people who came to the United Kingdom from Commonwealth nations broke.

He said the figures were provisional.

Although fully entitled to live and work in the United Kingdom, an unknown number of Windrush descendants have been wrongly identified as illegal immigrants and denied basic rights such as healthcare.

They have been identified after Home Office officials trawled through 8,000 records amid fears that people living lawfully in the United Kingdom for decades could have been forced to leave the country. So far, 526 people have been issued documents confirming their legal right to live in the UK.

Mr Javid told the committee: "I've asked officials to be absolutely certain and thorough and check over every record and make sure".

Of these, five have since been found to have no legal status and nine cases are still under examination, while three have established their right to be in the UK.

The admission comes after weeks of denials by the department that any member of the Windrush generation had been forced to leave Britain.

Writing on Twitter, Labour MP David Lammy said Mrs May needed to come to Parliament to explain how the 63 people were removed, describing the revelation as "truly a day of national shame".

Only last week immigration minister Caroline Nokes said she was still not aware of a single wrongful deportation of a Windrush citizen, despite Home Office chiefs admitting they knew of such cases.

The UK government said it had set up a scheme to compensate people who may have been wrongfully detained, sacked, had their bank accounts closed or lost their homes because of the scandal.

Latest News