Unhealthy Chinese meals 'should carry health warning'

Unhealthy Chinese meals 'should carry health warning'

Call for salt action on Chinese takeaways and ready meals

From the six dishes from six Chinese eateries investigated, 97 percent were found to contain no less than 2 grams of salt. Over half (58%) contained more than 3g of salt per dish - half of the recommended daily intake in the United Kingdom, 6g of salt (the World Health Organization recommends no more than 5g of salt).

New research has been just disclosed by Action on Salt, which is a group of experts concerned with salt and its effects of human health. the published report discovered surprising levels of deadly condiment used in Chinese ready meals and takeaways along with some Britain's saltiest menus that consists of same amount of salt found in five Big Macs in McDonald's. Expending excessively salt has been related to the advancement of degenerative wellbeing conditions, which incorporate coronary illness.

The saltiest Chinese dish was Slimming World's Chinese Style Banquet Rice with 4.40g salt per 550g pack.

"The current target is to reduce salt intake to an average of 6g a day for adults and even less for children, from the current average of 8.1g a day".

The survey, however, found that almost half of 141 supermarket Chinese ready meals analyzed contain over 1.8 grams of salt per portion, which is high enough to carry a red notification label on the pack.

"Chinese meals should carry a health warning on packaging and menus after a new survey based at the Wolfson Institute, Barts & The London, Queen Mary University of London has exposed the astonishing and harmful amounts of salt found in both Chinese takeaways and Chinese ready meals sold by some of the UK's biggest supermarkets".

Main courses (such as beef in black bean sauce) topped the list, but accompanying dishes such as rice, spring rolls or prawn crackers can also add to the total salt quantity. Study authors call on policymakers to make health labeling mandatory. "Reducing salt is the most cost effective measure to reduce the number of people dying or suffering from strokes or heart disease".

"This week, as part of Salt Awareness Week, we are asking everyone, including the food industry, to think first and use less salt".

Dr. Alison Tedstone, chief nutritionist at Public Health England suggests that our salt consumption has dropped over the last decade, however, there are some salt-rich products and we can reduce the consumption of these kinds of products.

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