Jupiter's Great Red Spot Is Slowly Dying

Jupiter's Great Red Spot simulated using data collected during NASA's Juno mission. Justin Cowart  Gerald Eichstadt  MSSS  SwRI  JPL-Caltech  NASA

Jupiter's Great Red Spot simulated using data collected during NASA's Juno mission. Justin Cowart Gerald Eichstadt MSSS SwRI JPL-Caltech NASA

Last year scientists had got to know from the data collected by Juno probe that the storms of Great Red Spot are estimated to be around 187 years old and could remain active after all of us are gone. However, according to a report, Jupiter's Great Red Spot will be vanquished within the next few decades, and will remain nothing but a memory. The Great Red Spot is a result of powerful jet streams which spin in opposite directions, but they won't be able to keep churning forever.

Thus, you should take a look at the famous storm of our solar system when it is still there because the Great Red Spot of Jupiter is shrinking and will most probably die in the next 10 or 20 years. When the GRS was first discovered, it was nearly four times bigger than our Earth. The longest running recorded storm on Earth lasted a full month.

NASA has been studying Jupiter and the fascinating giant storm wider than our planet closer than ever thanks to its Juno Spacecraft.

The Great Red Spot of Jupiter was discovered in 1831 by Samuel Heinrich Schwabe and is supposed to have a lifespan of between 350 and 500 years. But when Juno did some close flybys of Jupiter previous year, it revealed that Great Red Spot is shrinking and now it is nearly 30 percent bigger than our Earth. Another reason why is that Earth is much smaller compared to Jupiter and rotates more slowly, while it takes Jupiter roughly 10 hours to rotate on its own axis.

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With the exception of Saturn and its iconic rings, Jupiter is probably the most recognizable planet in our Solar System. Various factors including the moderation rotation rate, small size, and a dynamic atmosphere's presence that shapes the global jet stream, disrupt the unsafe weather systems before they go out of control.

When it was first spotted, it was twice as wide as Earth, but now it's just 1.3 times the diameter of our planet, Orgon says.

"The GRS will in a decade or two become the GRC (Great Red Circle)", Orton said.

These new looks at the Great Red Spot come courtesy of the NASA Juno spacecraft, which made the closest pass to the planet back in July of 2017. According to the observations of NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, a storm on Neptune has also nearly disappeared.

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