Sen. Kennedy: 'My experience with President Trump is he's not a racist'

Donald Trump: Shock over US president's migrants remarks

Donald Trump repeatedly called African nations 'shitholes,' senator says

He has to know, like we all do, that xenophobic commentary plays well with his base, the people who were more than happy to put him in office because they could seamlessly project their racism and misogyny onto his celebrity persona.

Trump hosted a large bi-partisan meeting at the White House on Tuesday, which turned into a spectacle, given that Trump let the camera-wielding press pool stay for 55 minutes.

Trump was quoted in the Washington Post as having said: 'Why are we having all these people from s***hole countries come here?' during a discussion about immigration.

The United Nations human rights office said it had no doubt Trump's remarks were "racist", while the Vatican newspaper branded them as "particularly harsh and offensive".

"Trump has always been a racist, only a racist can use such foul language", said Nancy Mulenga, a student at the University of Zambia.

On the eve of the eighth anniversary of the January 12, 2010, natural disaster that devastated Haiti, the president, in the Oval Office, is said to have wondered aloud why he should allow immigrants from "shithole countries" like Haiti, El Salvador and African nations to enter the United States.

Martin Luther King Jr.'s nephew, told CNN on Friday that while he does not believe President Donald Trump is a "racist in the traditional sense", he does think the President is "racially ignorant and racially uninformed".

The lawmakers had hoped Trump would back their accord, an agreement among six senators evenly split among Republicans and Democrats, ending a monthslong, bitter dispute over protecting the "dreamers".

He ignored reporters who shouted questions about his remarks.

Trump scrapped an Obama-era program that gave the 800,000 young immigrants legal protection, setting a March deadline for Congress to offer a fix - though it has been reinstated by a court, for now.

"There is a serious need for dialogue between the USA administration and the African countries". "It's frightening to have someone in the White House with this kind of ignorance and lack of compassion".

There was no mention at that time of the language that sources said Trump had used, details of which were soon leaked.

She also defended his alleged remarks, saying they were targeted towards the governments of those countries, not necessarily the people.

Botswana's foreign ministry summoned the US ambassador in protest and called the comments "highly irresponsible, reprehensible and racist".

Many have called for Mr Trump to apologise over his remarks which they say are racist.

Adding "Botswana has accepted USA citizens within her border over the years and countries to host United States guests and senior government officials including a Congressional delegation that will come to Botswana at the end of this month".

Haiti still remains the poorest country in the Americas.

The newspaper, L'Osservatore Romano, wrote about the comment in a front-page article about the immigration debate in the United States. Is that an appropriate term to be used to describe our allies and are you disappointed that this is what the President had to say? He also blamed "both sides" after a white supremacist rally in August in Charlottesville, Virginia, turned violent and a woman protesting against the rally was killed.

Mia Love, a Utah congresswoman of Haitian descent, called them "unkind" and "divisive" while South Carolina's Tim Scott, the only black Republican senator, said if Trump really did use those words, it would be "disappointing".

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