Republican Sen. Johnson and Independent Sen

Five Republican senators have announced they will not support the bill, which is created to repeal and replace Obamacare, in its current form.

"What I find so disappointing is these bills aren't going to fix the problem", Johnston said Sunday.

"They took the money out of health care, out of Medicaid and that's why we see 23 million Americans losing their health insurance", Durbin said. The plan would scale back aid to the poor and kill a tax on the wealthy. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., who each have expressed serious reservations with the bill for very different reasons, proclaimed during exclusive interviews on Sunday's "Meet The Press" that rushing a vote before the July 4th recess would be unwise. "Look forward to making it really special!" As of Sunday, Johnson is joined by fellow Republican Senators Ted Cruz, Mike Lee, Rand Paul and Dean Heller in standing against the Senate health care plan as it now exists. "I think they'll get some points". Activists and health organizations have argued that the bill's sweeping cuts to Medicaid would be life-threatening to many Americans. What we do know is that, in Louisiana, the bill would kill the expansion of Medicaid that has brought health care to more than 425,000 residents-with 51,000 of those people living right here in New Orleans.

The bill would cut and redesign the Medicaid program for low-income and disabled people, and erase taxes on higher earners and the medical industry that helped pay for the roughly 20 million Americans covered by Obama's law.

White House Counsel Kellyanne Conway, appearing on ABC's "This Week", dismissed the notion that the bill did not have enough support to pass, saying Trump "is prepared to have a conversation and discussion, and a negotiation with those senators and others" to ensure the bill passes.

"I want to see a bill with heart", he said, confirming a switch from his laudatory statements about the House bill at a Rose Garden ceremony with House Republican leaders last month.

Sen. Dean Heller, R-Nev., who faces a re-election bid in 2018, held a news conference Friday and raised similar concerns about the Medicaid cuts.

The former president's description of the bill's fundamental meanness did indeed echo words used by Trump to describe the House bill, which passed in May after an earlier vote on the healthcare bill was cancelled due to a lack of support from within the GOP. "There isn't anything in this bill that would lower premiums".

"As Democrats, we're doing everything we can to fight this bill".

"We don't have the courage in Washington, the honesty, to talk about this issue with real facts", he said.

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