Tillerson: Iran deal failed in key denuclearization objective

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Tillerson: Iran deal failed in key denuclearization objective

"Worn-out U.S. accusations can't mask its admission of Iran's compliance with JCPOA".

Tillerson notified Congress on Tuesday that despite finding that Iran was meeting the terms of the deal, the Trump administration will continue to review on whether to break from the agreement.

US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson has recently described the nuclear accord that was agreed between Iran and the world powers in 2015 as a "failure", adding the deal amounts to "passing the buck" on to future administrations. Tillerson called said that Iran remains a leading state sponsor of terrorism.

In the first reaction to Tillerson's remarks from a senior Iranian official, Zarif tweeted on Thursday (Friday NZT) that the United States should "fulfill its own commitments".

This week the secretary of state informed Congress that Tehran is keeping its side of the bargain to restrict its nuclear programme in exchange for the lifting of sanctions, which he's required to confirm every 90 days. It was the first such notification under US President Donald Trump.

In his tweet, Zarif also addressed Tillerson's terrorism charge: "Worn-out United States accusations can't mask its admission of Iran's compliance w/ JCPOA".

President Trump warned that Iran is not "living up" to the "spirit" of its worldwide nuclear deal at a press conference on Thursday.

As part of a long list of charges, he criticised Iran's involvement in the Syrian conflict and its support for President Bashar al-Assad.

The historic deal between Iran and six major powers restricts Tehran's nuclear programme in exchange for the lifting of worldwide oil and financial sanctions against the Islamic Republic. Under the groundbreaking agreement brokered by the Obama administration and allies, the U.S. and other European and western countries lifted sanctions against Iran in exchange for the Shia state opening up its nuclear sites to inspectors and dismantling centrifuges which the Obama administration claimed will prevent Iran from acquiring a nuclear weapon. Trump as a presidential candidate vowed to rip up the deal or renegotiate it, but hasn't said since taking office exactly how he'll proceed.

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